Tag Archives: winter

Feeding the bees, February edition

This morning the temperature has reached 50 degrees without a trace of breeze to disturb the February sunshine. Bees are flying around the hive, producing a ring of waste and corpses as they work at spring cleaning. It’s a perfect day to pop the top cover off and add to their stores as the first of their natural food sources won’t be in full production for another six weeks or so.

Bees in February

Last year I had correspondence with an elderly woman keeping bees in Visby, “The Gateway to Gotland” in northern Sweden. There is a tradition there of leaving the top super on all year with the “summer board” entrance covered over loosely with newspaper (traditionally it was birch bark). The advantages are that it allows for more air circulation, the newspaper or bark absorbs excess moisture (condensation is a bee-killer), and if the bees get restless for new space in the early spring they can move upstairs and build new comb. I find it’s handy for quick inspection and for feeding fondant and sugar syrup. This is my first year using the technique and my bees haven’t built any comb up there, but we have at least six weeks of winter yet to come – they have time on their hands and a play space if they want it.

They did come up through the inner cover to greet me when I dropped off the fondant.

Maine Bees fondant

 

The Journals, continued

Yesterday I finished an inventory of the journals found in my mother’s collection of papers. I’ve found them in ones and twos and occasionally five-years-worth tied together with ancient baling twine but haven’t run across any new ones lately, so I think this must be the lot: 53 books by two authors spanning the years 1900 to 1942. Here’s a sampling:

From Raymond Harrison Barnard (1893 – 1947) this entry for August 9, 1938 is about Jessie H. MacDonald’s death in Stevenson, Scotland; “our dear friend”. She was the family’s housekeeper for 25 years and had been visiting her birthplace in Scotland when she passed away unexpectedly at age 60. My mother remembers the family’s grief when they received the new that she had died right about the time they expected her to return. RHB’s journals are always inked in his lovely, loose scrawl and annotated with clippings and letters.

Jessie H. MacDonald obit

Benjamin Isaac (BI) Miller (1868 -1949); BI’s journals are done in pencil, interleaved with bills, receipts, and solicitations addressed to “The Mayor, Hartford Connecticut”. This little drawing of the farm is done on the back of a letter and carefully taped together with linen strips on the back.

Farm Drawing

From BI’s journal in 1914, a mimeograph from the Hartford County Rural Development Association encouraging us to “buy local” more than a century ago. It’s still a good read.

Rural Improvement Manifesto

Both men were fond of including pamphlets and advertisements in their journals. They wrote about attending presentations at the Grange and Masonic Halls on tuberculosis, infantile paralysis (polio) and the Mile of Dimes, eye exams, air raid protocols, and the latest news from Washington DC. Here’s a selection from RHB’s journal about the Panama Canal, which opened on August 15, 1914.

National Geographic

There’s a wealth of material about everyday life in the last century in these little books. Consider contributing to your local historical society to help them preserve your past. These journals will be at the Wintonbury Historical Society in Bloomfield, Connecticut.

 

Happy Grandma’s Birthday, everyone!

My grandmother, Martha Louise Miller, was born in Avon, Connecticut on August 3, 1900. Traditionally we have wonderful weather to celebrate her birth and today was no exception: bright and sunny with a cooling breeze; good for cutting hay or picking green beans, and remember to wear your bonnet!

I went looking for a photograph to share on her day and found this being used as a bookmark in Psalms in a family bible. Here she is, on the left, about six years old with her two older sisters all wearing warm and stylish hats.

Snow sisters

And the verso, in her daughter’s handwriting:

mlb-photo-verso

New work and Acadia National Park turns 100

The 2016 Acadia National Park centennial celebration has started with a bang, or well, a bean supper and an art show at the local kid’s summer camp. My work has taken many twists and turns over the past decades; from pastel to oil and still life to cityscape, and now “rocks and water” have come around just in time to celebrate a century of public access to some of the most beautiful scenery in the world. Just off the easel, Bass Harbor Rocks I, oil on panel, 24 x 18 inches.

Bass Harbor Light Maine

 

New work, Bass Harbor

We finally have coverage at our house that seemed cleverly sited to hide from every cell phone tower in the area and now I have a phone! This is relevant because evidently phones have cameras now – very fine cameras indeed – and I can post documentation of works in progress without dragging the Canon down to the studio. I apologize in advance for the art-spam coming your way, have a spruce tree at the Bass Harbor Light to start:

Bass Harbor Light Spruce tree

Garden 2016 – the seed order

I’ve held off on ordering seeds this year in hopes it will keep me from starting the tomatoes too soon and having them grow into hedges under the lights down cellar. Looking back at 20 years of records this is my latest order to date and the earliest was in November of 2002, back in the bad old days when we filled out the complex Fedco orders in the cheap newsprint catalog. The ink bled through the pages and I got my maths wrong every year.

Now the order form is online and does all the sums automagically. After some judicious editing for costs and allowing for a few indulgences, behold the 2016 seed order, below. Indulgences include:

Good King Henry, an open-pollinated perennial used as a pot-herb. I had always assumed it was named for an actual monarch, but no: Henry comes from the germanic haganrich which is literally ‘king of the hedge,’ a gremlin with goose’s feet that helps around the house and puts things where they belong. I’ll be able

Balady Aswan Celtuce, I feel like this would make a good band name, or an unbreakable password in a sci-fi movie. It’s actually a variety of Egyptian lettuce that is “customarily allowed to bolt and enjoyed for its 12–14″ crunchy stems with creamy flavor”. This is just the sort of thing that should growing in my garden.

By Downtowngal - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10526787

230A – Jade Bush Green Beans ( A=2oz ) 1 x $2.30 = $2.30
298A – Windsor Fava Beans ( A=2oz ) 1 x $1.60 = $1.60
658A – Silver Queen White Sweet Corn ( A=2oz ) 1 x $2.50 = $2.50
818A – Oregon Giant Snow Peas ( A=2oz ) 1 x $1.60 = $1.60
916A – Dove Ananas Type ( A=1g ) 1 x $2.40 = $2.40
1312A – Marketmore 76 Slicing Cucumbers ( A=1/16oz ) 1 x $1.00 = $1.00
2058A – Red Cored Chantenay Carrots ( A=1/8oz ) 1 x $1.00 = $1.00
2093A – Yaya OG Carrots ( A=1g ) 1 x $2.20 = $2.20
2149A – Touchstone Gold OG Beets ( A=1/8oz ) 1 x $2.00 = $2.00
2425A – Bleu de Solaize Leeks ( A=1/16oz ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
2538A – Avon Spinach ( A=1/4oz ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
2715A – Balady Aswan OG Celtuce ( A=1g ) 1 x $2.30 = $2.30
2764A – Blushed Butter Oaks OG Leaf Lettuce ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.80 = $1.80
2768A – Lingua di Canarino (Canary Tongue) OG Leaf Lettuce ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
2773A – Hyper Red Rumple Waved OG Leaf Lettuce ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.70 = $1.70
2921A – Anuenue OG Batavian Lettuce ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
2985A – Red Carpet Lettuce Mix OG Lettuce Mix ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.80 = $1.80
3096A – Good King Henry Good King Henry ( A=0.5g ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
3218A – Senposai Senposai ( A=1/16oz ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
3223A – Yokatta-Na Yokatta-Na ( A=1/16oz ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
3226A – Early Mizuna OG Mizuna ( A=1/16oz ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
3309A – Green Super Broccoli ( A=0.5g ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
3327A – Piracicaba Broccoli ( A=2g ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
3339A – Gustus Brussels Sprouts ( A=0.5g ) 1 x $2.80 = $2.80
3397A – Wirosa Savoy Cabbages ( A=0.1g ) 1 x $2.00 = $2.00
3459A – Darkibor Kale ( A=0.5g ) 1 x $2.20 = $2.20
3461A – Red Russian Kale ( A=2g ) 1 x $1.00 = $1.00
3776A – Feher Ozon OG Sweet Peppers ( A=0.2g ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
4038A – Cosmonaut Volkov OG Tomatoes ( A=0.2g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
4059A – Cherokee Purple OG Tomatoes ( A=0.2g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
4146A – Blue Beech OG Paste Tomatoes ( A=0.2g ) 1 x $1.60 = $1.60
4253A – Jasper OG Cherry Tomatoes ( A=0.02g ) 1 x $3.60 = $3.60
4414A – Sweet Basil Basil ( A=4g ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
4510A – Bodegold Chamomile Chamomile ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
4588A – Lemon Balm Lemon Balm ( A=0.3g ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
4668A – Silver Sagebrush White Sage ( A=0.02g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40
4836A – Carnival Amaranths ( A=0.2g ) 1 x $1.50 = $1.50
5350A – Elka OG Poppies ( A=0.1g ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
5351A – Ziar Breadseed OG Poppies ( A=0.1g ) 1 x $1.30 = $1.30
5611A – Perennial Sweet Pea Sweet Peas ( A=1g ) 1 x $1.40 = $1.40

Total for seeds this year = $66.90, plus $4.00 USD that I’m spending on Heirloom Black Sea Samsun Turkish tobacco seed from Hart’s because I think the bees are going to go crazy over tobacco blossoms.

New work

The houses in Stonington, Maine continue to be an inspiration. Snow melts and blows away quickly this close to the ocean so I haven’t managed to get out painting on a day with both sun and white stuff, but that’s the next project. Meanwhile, a small painting (16 x 12) of a house with blue awnings on the west side.

Stonington Maine

November 18, 1918, the letter home

One of my New Year’s resolutions for this year was to close out my storage unit. The monthly fee could definitely be put to more productive use than to store plastic totes of papers and objects wrapped in tissue paper and the only thing standing in my way was the utter lack of storage space at home. I started in March by bringing home each new box only after dispersing (or disposing of) the contents of the previous haul, but the year is closing out and suddenly I have a pile of The Great Historical Unknown in the living room. It doesn’t help that the oldest material was at the back of the locker, and by old I mean that’s where the Civil War era spectacles and cigar boxes of cut-throat razors are hanging out.

One box in the latest batch is packed with old papers – a 3 x 4 foot plastic vault of WWII ration books, blueprints, site surveys of farm buildings, order pads from the dairy, inventories of carriages and repair records, and, tucked away in a very worn copy of Walt Whitman poems, a letter home from my grandfather when he was an 24 year-old infantryman billeted in a French shack with 20 other men and an old iron stove.

The letter is on lined paper worn tissue-thin with age and written in blunt pencil. Parts are illegible but most of the script has survived the last century remarkably intact. His C.O. has scrawled “OK” on the last page in ink, presumably approving it for mailing. I’ve transcribed what I could below. Pvt. Raymond Harrison Barnard survived the war and married my grandmother in 1926; my mother was born in ’28. He died on his farm in Bloomfield, Connecticut in 1947.

WW1 letter 1 nov-17-1918-a

November 17, 1918   Dear Folks:

It is almost ten days since I wrote you last. We have been billeted here in the woods six days. The first two days I was too cold to write since then we have drilled four days till dark. Winter’s coming on now and we have to keep moving while out of doors to keep warm. There are about 20 of us in this hut. There are no windows so that we leave the door open for light. We have installed an old stove like the one in the <old?> house but it has no place to set a kettle on it so we can’t cook.  The floor was awfully muddy when we arrived but we have had some fine weather which has done well to dry it up.

Last Thursday (I think it was) I heard the bells of the nearby villages ringing for a long time and we figured out that the armistice was signed. I look forward with great hope. M. I would be surprised to get home in three months if we don’t have to go somewhere to do guard duty. We shall doubtless move from here soon.(We had a bath 3 days ago and are to be paid today!) I do not know what is to become of us. The company is being reorganized (we have more replacements) but I hope to stay with them just the same. I am willing to do my part. Have been with the company now nearly 5 weeks and have received no mail yet. I hope you hear from me more frequently than that. If we are not to be sent home till spring I hope we will move to some town where we can have warm billets. This isn’t so cold here but all the shacks are sort of open work. We may go to Germany to do guard duty.

We have better bunks here and I have got so much regular sleep. I feel much better and that bad cold in my lungs is gone. The 3rd day out of the trenches we stayed in a small town called Francourt. I and a fellow named Montgomery went to the river and took a bath. The water was ice cold but we pretty near rid ourselves of the cooties. We marched up here as a reserve division. I get if the Germans hadn’t signed the armistice we would have made a smashing drive right thru this sector.

Today is Sunday and we are not working so we have all washed and shaved and taken turns at getting wood for our stove. We stayed one night and part of a day in a town on our way here and I bought me a knife, pipe, h’d’k’f’s, soap, matches, etc. We have had manouvers twice since arriving here and yesterday afternoon we had a regimental review. We are all longing to be home. The war is finished and we are not needed over here much longer. Yesterday as we came back up the hill with our carts and guns a Frenchman passed us on a horse. He said “Now this war is finished and you won’t need them again.” Let us hope that is all true.

The new Srgt that just came up said that all along the line the French were drinking wine and ringing the bells like everything. I’ll bet I will ring a few bells when I get home. Door bells at least. We had a fine Lieut in command of our Platoon. His name was Gregg. His home was in or near St. Louis. I asked him if he knew any people named Filley. He said yes. My pal Dwight Filley was killed at Chateau Thierry. He was a fine Lieut. He was sent to a school and I have since been put in another platoon. The Lieut Commanding my new platoon comes from the batallion with which I trained at Salle-sur-Cher.The boys fixed our stove pipe so that the stove doesn’t smoke so bad. When I get home I guess I will go up to the Wilcox lot and put up a shack there. I keep imagining what I will do when I get home. We will all get together soon. I haven’t heard from Ray Watkins since I left Salle. I suppose you may hear from him through his mother. I’ll bet there are a good many fellows in the new draft who are glad the war is finished. Well, you will hear from me again soon.

Love to all,

Pvt. Raymond H. Barnard, MG. Co. 140 U.S. Infantry

American E.F.

OK. 2nd Lt. ? Herman A Huston

March 2015: The Snow Garden

The first crop to be direct-seeded is always the peas. Some years I have tomato seedlings under lights that are weeks old, lettuce and green onions in flats, trays of cosmos and delphinium, but all those will have to wait until May before venturing outside. The peas are hardy souls, they love the icy soil, and they’re cheap enough that I can re-sow a batch if the temperatures drop too low.

This year we have nearly 4′ of snow over the entire garden. We had a few days this week where the temperatures finally made it above freezing but the snow pack simply settled and solidified. It’s not going anywhere fast. Yesterday I decided to help it along a little by digging through the drifts at the front of the house and excavating a bed to help it warm up under a sheet of black plastic.

Our metal roof dumps snow easily, which is a good thing when we don’t have to climb up there and shovel if off, and a bad thing when I have to cut through 5 – 6′ of packed drifts. Here’s the path to the spring pea bed (eventually):

pea-bed-001

I was very pleased that I managed to aim right to the corner of the pea bed – that is some NASA level shoveling right there.

shovel snow Now to shovel off the bed proper and cover it with black plastic to warm up:

future peas

For reference, this is what the rest of the garden looks like now, in March:

digging out or in

And this is the same view in June, 2014:

Maine JuneFor my bee group, all that yellow bloom is Dyer’s Woad, Isatis tinctoria. It’s a wonderful bee plant and a good source of blue dye.