Tag Archives: painting

New work and Acadia National Park turns 100

The 2016 Acadia National Park centennial celebration has started with a bang, or well, a bean supper and an art show at the local kid’s summer camp. My work has taken many twists and turns over the past decades; from pastel to oil and still life to cityscape, and now “rocks and water” have come around just in time to celebrate a century of public access to some of the most beautiful scenery in the world. Just off the easel, Bass Harbor Rocks I, oil on panel, 24 x 18 inches.

Bass Harbor Light Maine

 

New work, Bass Harbor

We finally have coverage at our house that seemed cleverly sited to hide from every cell phone tower in the area and now I have a phone! This is relevant because evidently phones have cameras now – very fine cameras indeed – and I can post documentation of works in progress without dragging the Canon down to the studio. I apologize in advance for the art-spam coming your way, have a spruce tree at the Bass Harbor Light to start:

Bass Harbor Light Spruce tree

New work

The houses in Stonington, Maine continue to be an inspiration. Snow melts and blows away quickly this close to the ocean so I haven’t managed to get out painting on a day with both sun and white stuff, but that’s the next project. Meanwhile, a small painting (16 x 12) of a house with blue awnings on the west side.

Stonington Maine

Blackberry Branches – off the easel

Summer is a busy time. There have been weekends off-island (sometimes on another island), hours spent in the garden, long days spent at work, and lots and lots of holiday traffic. Somehow, I eked out enough studio time to complete the Blackberry Branches painting, and it’s probably my largest and most complex piece to date: 36 x 24 inches, oil on panel.

Blackberry branches with Ranier Cherries

And some details:

Detail of buds

Detail, Queen Ann cherriesNow, on to a landscape from a sketching trip down to Bernard, on the very tip of MDI. Looking forward to a little more focal length in this one!

 

New work: Quince Branches in a Tan Vase

So much is happening in the garden: two new hives of bees, new bee fodder (phacelia!), new green manure mixtures, and a foray into next-gen gardening with Bio-Char. I want to write about all of it but there’s still life material growing out there too. The Ruby-Gold ornamental quince put out flowering branches for the first time this year; combined with a new thrift store tablecloth it made an excellent color study.

Ruby Gold Quince

Quince in a Tan Vase, 24 x 18, oil on panel

New Work – Land and Garden Preserve

Every year the Land and Garden Preserve, keeper of some of the most beautiful properties on our beautiful island, solicits pieces from local artists for a fundraiser in late summer. The 2015 event will be July 30 – August 1 at the Asticou Inn, Northeast Harbor, Maine. I had the opportunity to paint inside Thuja Lodge over the course of several afternoons in September with some of their lovely still life objects on display.

Thuja Gardens Maine

The Dutch Shelves, Thuja Lodge – oil on panel

Here’s a detail of the view to the kitchen:

Thuja Lodge, detail

 

New work: Glads in a Green Jar

I think this is my last work done from drawings and site photos during summer 2014. I have months to go until the 2015 crop of glads comes in, but will spend that time doing studies of new glassware acquisitions and prepping for new varieties of cosmos as raw material.  Meanwhile:

Gladiola in blue mason jar

Glads in a Green Jar, oil on panel, 36 x 24

Cool tools: Silicoil

Silicoil

That simple jar with a smooth coil insert sitting on my palette is the best brush-cleaning tool I’ve ever had. I have mine filled with Turpenoid and periodically poor off the clean stuff, wipe out the sediment that collects at the bottom (the coil is easily removed for access) and then refill with the same solvent. The write-up at Dick Blick Art Supply says:

Be kind to your fine art brushes!Stroking a brush across the smooth surface of the aluminum coil opens and separates the hairs for proper cleaning without damaging the fragile flags (the delicate split ends of brush hairs).

This heavy glass tank with a screw-on lid holds up to 12 oz (355 ml) of water, solvent or Silicoil Brush Cleaning Fluid.

Cheap at $6.00 a jar, this has probably already paid for itself in resurrected brushes.