Tag Archives: architectural landscape

New work

The houses in Stonington, Maine continue to be an inspiration. Snow melts and blows away quickly this close to the ocean so I haven’t managed to get out painting on a day with both sun and white stuff, but that’s the next project. Meanwhile, a small painting (16 x 12) of a house with blue awnings on the west side.

Stonington Maine

New work: Little White Town

On day last October I meandered down the coast and finally settled on a view across the harbor to the Town of Stonington in the late day sun. It was cool and clear and I managed to dodge the group of photographers with HUGE lenses who were also hunting for the perfect light; that trophy view of little white structures gamely climbing the hill above the ocean.

Many thanks to the Stonington Free Library for providing shelter and a place to check my email. The librarian was endlessly patient with folks who couldn’t remember the last name of the author (Wilder) or the title of that series about Merlin (which turned out to be the Arthurian Saga by Mary Stewart). It was a wonderful day.

Stonington Maine

Little White Town I, Stonington, 18″ x 36″, oil on panel

New Work – Land and Garden Preserve

Every year the Land and Garden Preserve, keeper of some of the most beautiful properties on our beautiful island, solicits pieces from local artists for a fundraiser in late summer. The 2015 event will be July 30 – August 1 at the Asticou Inn, Northeast Harbor, Maine. I had the opportunity to paint inside Thuja Lodge over the course of several afternoons in September with some of their lovely still life objects on display.

Thuja Gardens Maine

The Dutch Shelves, Thuja Lodge – oil on panel

Here’s a detail of the view to the kitchen:

Thuja Lodge, detail

 

New work, matching set

August in Maine is by turns bright and stormy, and always chock full of cars, camper vans, and people. We have family and friends visiting, phone calls and g-chat, and people in expensive cars from out-of-state pulling over to the side of the gravel road to ask about the garden and take pictures. All this will start to taper off after Labor Day and disappear entirely before Thanksgiving so I’ll take the crowds now as antidote to the barren landscape when it comes. Meanwhile, in the moments in between visitors, we paint.

This is the matching piece to last month’s small painting done in Frenchboro titled “Shade Trees”, 20 x 16, oil on panel. Both pieces are currently hanging at the Artemis Gallery in Northeast Harbor, and look lovely glowing under the good lights against the white walls there.

Frenchboro Harbor

 

New work, redux

There’s probably a label for the blogging disorder of allowing photos to lapse past their freshness date. . . I go out into the garden these days to gather visuals and am immediately distracted by ripe blueberries, carrots that should be pulled to make room for a second planting, and slugs in the zinnias. On the other hand, our new studio building is making it much easier to be disciplined about painting.

This painting of Frenchboro harbor is one of two that will be hung as a set at Artemis Gallery in Northeast Harbor for a show opening August 14. 20 x 16, oil on panel, finished last week – pic of its other half coming soon.

Frenchboro wharf August

New work – Frenchboro Harbor series

I have four new blog entries started and material just keeps coming; the title of this blog was never more apropos than the bees and art in spring 2014. It’s all very exciting but very little is actually being posted. To remedy that, here’s a quick look at a study for a larger painting now on the easel of Frenchboro Harbor. Done from studies and photos taken last August, this study represents a departure for me in terms of image and paint application.

Frenchboro Harbor Study; Big Trees  16″ x 20″, oil on panel

Frenchboro Harbor

Here’s a detail of the paint: applied without medium a la Cezanne, “a short stroke representing only the brush exploring the form”.

Big trees detail

Work in progress – the Studio

Our studio is slowly taking shape down the hill in the swamp. The 14′ x 20′ frame was completed last week.

new studio 1

The large opening on the second floor front will frame the sliders that open on to my studio space via an outside staircase. Below is the door to R’s space on the first floor.

new studio front

Nice view out the first floor windows to the swamp. I’ll have one large window on that side, but wasn’t up for climbing the ladder to the second floor.

post and beam studio interior

And, for old time’s sake, a photo of the old studio before we tore it down and started this one in almost the same spot. 10 x 12, one story on posts, it served the purpose for a long time – now on to something new and much better insulated!

before picture

New work

I’ve finished a 16″ x 20″ study of the front room at Thuya Lodge. There’s a lot going on in this small space and I think it’s a good choice for a larger painting – 32″ x 40″ would be very large for me.

Thuya Lodge study - The Rocking ChairWhen I finish a painting I often study enlarged random sections of the digital image. Do the individual brush strokes make sense of the shapes? Is the color pure and purposeful? Do the edges where colors meet perform well? I fall short of the mark of course, but it’s a helpful process on the long road to improvement. Below are the sections I chose to examine on this piece:

random detail ceiling

random detail lamp

random detail lamp 2