Category Archives: Grand Manan

Blizzard warning!

Tonight there’s a scary-beautiful conflagration of low pressure and high cold air that will bring us 20″ of spring snow and 50 mph winds by early morning. The storm will intensify over the Gulf of Maine and bring even higher winds to the Nova Scotia reaches, scouring the highlands and dumping 2′ of snow along the way.

But isn’t it pretty? That’s us – right between the huge gray high and the Buddhist monk orange low.

Blizzard warning

Time to go fill the teakettle and grind some coffee before the power goes out. Stay warm, everyone!

 

Gran Manan geology – the rock collection

I have an entire folder on our file server named “rocks”. While we were on Gran Manan this summer we explored Red Point. The guide book says;

RED POINT – A left turn just as you enter Seal Cove will lead you along Red Point Road to Red Point beach. This is an area of great interest to geologists. From the parking area climb down onto the beach at the Point; you will find two geological eras clearly visible in the cliff face. To the left of the dividing line, or geologic contact, you see dark grey lava rock; to the right of the line you see red rock – much older in origin. With the use of a magnet, you can collect magnetic sand (magnetite) on the beach. Part of the point was acquired by the Anchorage Park in 1996, and picnic and parking facilities were added. The boardwalk to the Anchorage Park is also accessible from here.

The boardwalk mentioned above is very impressive. About half way to Anchorage we jumped off and made our way down a steep embankment to the beach. We walked back the way we came for about half an hour, looking for a place to climb back up and not finding one, taking turns saying; “Maybe around that next point!”. Fortunately, we’re experienced islanders and started at low tide. High tide here at Bar Harbor today was 12′, on Gran Manan it was 5.8 meters, or about 19′. We finally made it off the beach at the geologic contact at Red Point. I tried to document examples of all the different rocks along the beach and gave up at 200 photos; here are three – more later.

RED POINT A left turn just as you enter Seal Cove will lead you along Red Point Road to Red Point beach. This is an area of great interest to geologists.  From the parking area climb down onto the beach at the Point; you will find two geological eras clearly visible in the cliff face. To the left of the dividing line, or geologic contact, you see dark grey lava rock; to the right of the line you see red rock – much older in origin. With the use of a magnet, you can collect magnetic sand (magnetite) on the beach. Part of the point was acquired by the Anchorage Park in 1996, and picnic and parking facilities were added. The boardwalk to the Anchorage Park is also accessible from here. A facility for Whale Camp, a summer camp for kids, is located on Red Point Road.

Grand Manan, pies deux

Days 3 and 4: hiking trails that end at a 100′ drop, weird characters on the library keyboard, lemon cream blue berry pie, seals, Hole in the Wall, herring weirs, Fish Head, hiking trails that end abruptly at a 200′ drop, having Eel Brook Beach all to ourselves and the constant hum of the ferry, just off shore.

Grand Manan, pies une

We’re here! We almost missed the ferry, after planning to be there early, because we forgot all about Atlantic Time, which is an hour earlier, eh? Then our trip was delayed while the ferry crew heroically rescued three people adrift in the freezing Bay of Fundy after their boat overturned. Only one was wearing a PFD, but they all made it. “Too much speed and too much drink,” according to the rescue crew.

Then it was a short drive to a lovely cottage, and a walk down the hill to our own personal cliff.

Now off to discover some haddock in leek cream.