Category Archives: art

New work: Study for “Mrs. M. and a Cherry Tree”

I very much wanted to title this piece “Mrs. M. and the Cherry Tree That Desperately Needs Pruning” but that sounded too much like the next Harry Potter novel.

Figure in a garden, cherry tree

This is a study for a larger painting, but we have to get our model time in when we can (especially during blackfly season).

Ivory Black on panel, 24 x 24

New work: Hibiscus in the Morning

Hibiscus is one of the last perennials to “wake up” every spring in the Maine garden, but is reliably, improbably, hardy in zone 5. Come September the flowers glow like torches lit against the dark maroon foliage. An autumn morning cloudy sky and apple branches add to the illusion that the papery flowers, beloved of Kali, are lit from within.

Hibiscus #1, 36 x 24, oil on panel

New work: Honeysuckle and Dame’s Rocket

The days are just packed, as Calvin used to say to Hobbs. I have posts nearly ready to go about the Island-wide story slam, a recipe for arroz con/sin pollo in the wood oven, and a lecture on waffle gardening that I gave to the Castine Scientific Society last Tuesday. Meanwhile, I’ve been working my way through the first complete iteration of my “still life in situ” project with this painting of a honeysuckle vine framed by purple Matronalis.

This planting is in the dooryard, and I see it every morning as I leave the house in all kinds of weather and times of day. I want my paintings to represent something familiar and well known: plants that I’ve tended, pruned, picked for bouquets and appreciated in place. The time of day and season has become increasingly important to me.  I felt my previous still life compositions with vases and drapery had very little atmosphere. The morning light here provides context, and the blooms and foliage represent a particular stage of their growth and decay, which has long been a prime characteristic of still life painting.

honeysuckle dames rocket

Honeysuckle and Dame’s Rocket, 36 x 24, oil on panel

Honeysuckle, dames rocket, detail

And a detail, now with hummingbird!

On the easel. . .

Honeysuckle is a reliable plant in the Maine climate, and I’d probably grow it for the hummingbirds even if it was fussy to grow. They flit in and out of the foliage from June to September and even the most competitive males find neutral territory to feed in peace on the red trumpets scattered over this huge, tangled bush. The purple flowers are Matronalis, or Dame’s Rocket, a member of the mustard family and much more deer-proof than Phlox, which they strongly resemble.

hummingbird honeysuckle

The final work will be 36 x 24, and the medium is oil on panel. We’re about halfway done in this photo, wish me luck!

New work: Compass Harbor, Bald Porcupine Island

This oil on panel is only 24 x 18 inches but required many color studies and more than a few site visits to finish. The granite underlying most of Mount Desert Island is a pink coarse-grained hornblende granite (Cadillac Mountain Granite) but Compass Harbor features a variety of older stratified rocks, including a volcanic series of tuff, felsite and interbedded volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The jumble of intersecting planes is fascinating, especially when the rocks are damp and showing off their true colors.

Compass Harbor Bald Porcupine

Compass Harbor with Bald Porcupine Island, 24 x 18, oil on panel

New work: Amy’s Maine Coloring Book

Amy’s Maine Coloring Book is now available on Amazon!

Hours of tedium and help from amazing friends turned this from an oft-heard comment (“Your drawings look like they could be paint-by-numbers!) into an actual book out in the real world.

Thanks to all, with a special shout-out to all the people who saw a woman in the road staring intently at their home over the edge of her sketchbook, and simply shrugged and went about their day without thinking too much about it.