Category Archives: still life

New work: Glads in a Green Jar

I think this is my last work done from drawings and site photos during summer 2014. I have months to go until the 2015 crop of glads comes in, but will spend that time doing studies of new glassware acquisitions and prepping for new varieties of cosmos as raw material.  Meanwhile:

Gladiola in blue mason jar

Glads in a Green Jar, oil on panel, 36 x 24

New work!

Posted in haste, there’s a lot to do today now that the sun is out! Time to unearth the gladiola bulbs from winter storage down cellar, clean them of last year’s soil and roots, and decide on a color planting arrangement for Garden 2015. I’m thinking those red ones, var. Palm Beach, should go near the front.

Gladiolas

Glads in a Blue Jar, 36 x 24, oil on panel, and a detail:

Gladiola detail

 

New work

We have so much snow on the ground that the thought of painting it makes me shiver. I’m making drawings of the dark spruce trees bending under heaps of pristine white, but as an antidote I’m finishing images from this summer. The crab apples are from the community garden and orchard at College of the Atlantic.

Crab Apples and Teapot

Crab Apples and Teapot, 24 x 18, oil on panel

New work – Apples on a Yellow Cloth

I’ve been slowly working up to larger paintings since we moved into the new studio last winter. The larger space is helpful but there are  other factors as well, such as brush size, paint consistency, and composition. Fortunately all those very disparate things seem to be growing together. This new painting is the next standard size up: 24″ x 36″ and seemed like a whole new country after working on 18″ x 24″ panels for years. Now that I’m working on a few pieces this size I can hardly wait to move up to 48 x 72!

Apples and Zinnias

 

Apples on a Yellow Cloth, 24 x 36, oil on panel

New work – Acadian bouquet

A still life of all the flowers that grow along the paths and roadways on the island: mallow, borage, goatsbeard (Aruncus), echinecea, sage, and thistle. I’ve made myself a note not to try borage again for a while – it was incredibly difficult to make sense of in the drawing!

Acadia bouquet

 

Acadian Bouquet, 24 x 18 inches, oil on panel

Thuya bouquet series: Chinese Vase with Mums

New encaustic on the easel:

Mums in a Chinese Vase

On Sundays I have time to heat the wax and really think through the layers I need to produce complex colors in layers of wax. Encaustic bears a great resemblance to printmaking media, in that each mark is finite and permanent; there is no moving the color around after that first brushstroke. Of course, our winter days are so short I don’t have enough daylight to take a photo of the finished piece until the following Saturday, but I’ll try to post these on a weekly schedule. Next up, a small white vase with a pink spider mum against a gray sky and an entirely new vocabulary of colors to learn.

Encaustics: warm work for cold days

Ecaustic paint is a mixture of pigment and beeswax, tempered with damar varnish and kept molten on a hot plate or griddle. Now that the temperature is dropping and snow is piling up on the studio stairs the thought of a cold November day spent leaning over warm dishes of fragrant wax is very tempting. My set-up consists of an electric pancake griddle, metal condiment dishes purchased in bulk from a restaurant supply store, and hog bristle brushes.

hot plate encaustic

I use a 1:10 part mix of bagged damar crystals melted into plain, unfiltered beeswax. The damar is available from most art supply stores – don’t use damar varnish because it contains solvents. Filtered, bleached, and cleaned beeswax is also available.  I use wax from my beehives and it’s VERY unfiltered so I do pick bees, sticks, and flower parts out of it occasionally.

You can purchase special encaustic painting surfaces but any sturdy, stable surface will do. Canvas and other fabric mounts will crack and peel when the wax hardens. This is an ancient technique and extremely durable when the surface is stable. Special paint and brushes are available, but honestly oil pigment (not more than 1:20) and regular bristle brushes work just as well. Make a place to rest your brushes on the heat source to melt the wax coating. Keep your fingers away from the metal ferrules – they will be very hot!

There are many detailed tutorials on the web on encaustic media. Most are very good on the basic steps but I’ve been disappointed in the imagery. Don’t assume that the wax somehow demands soft colors and undefined contours! This is the first in a series of bouquet paintings from Thuya Lodge, part of the Mount Desert Land and Garden Preserve on Mount Desert island. This piece will be available at their auction in 2015: Nasturtium in a Brown Vase, 16 x 12, encaustic media.

nasturiums-in-a-brown-vase

New work

It’s November, and the garden is gray and cold so it’s time to finish up all those paintings I started of roses back in July and August! This one is Königin von Danemark (Queen of Denmark), a Portland rose introduced in 1826. It blooms all season – in fact it would probably be blooming right now except that the deer got to it a few nights ago. Very sad, but stay tuned for updates on an improved electric fence mapping project.

Königin von Danemark

Roses in a Green Glass, 24 x 18, oil on panel.

New work

I have a new mantra: Wait for Everything to be Dry, and a new policy on using mediums (linseed oil, etc.) in my paint: Don’t Use Any Medium, and a new slogan written on the wall of the studio in black marker: Really, Wait for It To Dry. This is the first piece I’ve finished with all the rules in place and I’m very pleased with it.

Red Flowers, White Pitcher

Red Flowers, White Pitcher. 24 x 18, oil on panel.

Up next, and Blagden Preserve landscape using the same constraints keeps life interesting. . .